LIVE IN THE PRESENT, DO NOT WORRY ABOUT TOMORROW

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about its own things.

Sufficient for the day is its own trouble. Matthew 6:34

 

SUPPORTING SCRIPTURE

Matthew 6:25
Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes?

Matthew 6:27
Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his lifespan?

Luke 10:41
“Martha, Martha,” the Lord replied, “you are worried and upset about many things.
Luke 12:22
Then Jesus said to His disciples, “Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat, or about your body, what you will wear.

Philippians 4:6
Be anxious for nothing, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

1 Peter 5:7
Cast all your anxiety on Him, because He cares for you.



SELECT COMMENTARY

Pulpit Commentary
Verse 34. – Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. Matthew only. Luke’s conclusion to this section (“Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom”) is perhaps more closely connected with the preceding verse, and also grander as dwelling upon God’s side; but Matthew’s is more practical, dealing with the subject from man’s side. Christ says, “Because all needful things shall be added, do not have one anxious thought for the future, even for what is coming on the very next day.” Such anxiety shows a want of common sense, for each day brings its own burden of anxiety for itself. Christ here seems to allow anxiety for each day as it comes round. “But,” he says, “put off your to-morrow’s anxiety until to-morrow.” If this be done, the greater part of all our anxiety is put aside at once, and, for the rest of it, the principle will apply to each hour as well as to each day (cf. Bengel). The Christian will ever try to follow the inspired advice of St. Paul (Philippians 4:6) and St. Peter (1 Peter 5:7). The morrow shall take thought for; “be anxious” as supra. The things of itself; for itself (Revised Version); αὑτῆς. The unique construction of the genitive after μεριμνάω led to the insertion of τὰ by the copyists (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:32-34). Sufficient unto the day, etc.; Tyndale, “For the day present hath ever enough of his own trouble.” Sufficient (Matthew 10:25, note).



Gill’s Exposition of the Entire Bible
Take therefore no thought for the morrow,…. Reference is had to Proverbs 27:1. “Boast not of thyself tomorrow”: a man cannot promise or assure himself, that he shall have a morrow, and therefore it is great weakness and folly to be anxiously thoughtful about it. This is expressed in the Talmud (s), nearer the sense of Christ’s words, after this manner:

, “do not distress thyself with tomorrow’s affliction, for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth”; perhaps tomorrow may not be, and thou wilt be found distressing thyself, for the time which is nothing to thee.”

And should it come, it is unnecessary to be thoughtful of it in a distressing manner before hand;

for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. The morrow is here introduced by a “prosopopeia”, as if it was a person sufficiently thoughtful and careful for the necessaries of it: every day brings along with it fresh care and thought, being attended with fresh wants and troubles; and therefore, it is very unadvisable, to bring the cares and troubles of two days upon one; as he does, who is anxiously concerned today, for the things of tomorrow;

sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. This proverb is thus expressed in the Talmud (t), , “sufficient for distress”, or “vexation, is the present time”; which the gloss explains thus,

“sufficient for the vexation it is, that men should grieve for it, at the time that it comes upon them.”

It is very wrong to anticipate trouble, or meet it before hand; if it was for no other reason but this, that every day’s trouble is enough, and should not be needlessly added to, by an over concern what shall be done for tomorrow; or how shall the necessities of it be answered, or the trials of it be endured.

(s) T. Bab. Sanhedrim, fol. 100. 2.((t) T. Bab. Beracot, fol. 9. 2.
Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary
34. Take therefore no thought—anxious care.

for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself—(or, according to other authorities, “for itself”)—shall have its own causes of anxiety.

Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof—An admirable practical maxim, and better rendered in our version than in almost any other, not excepting the preceding English ones. Every day brings its own cares; and to anticipate is only to double them.
Matthew Henry Commentary
6:25-34 There is scarcely any sin against which our Lord Jesus more warns his disciples, than disquieting, distracting, distrustful cares about the things of this life. This often insnares the poor as much as the love of wealth does the rich. But there is a carefulness about temporal things which is a duty, though we must not carry these lawful cares too far. Take no thought for your life. Not about the length of it; but refer it to God to lengthen or shorten it as he pleases; our times are in his hand, and they are in a good hand. Not about the comforts of this life; but leave it to God to make it bitter or sweet as he pleases. Food and raiment God has promised, therefore we may expect them. Take no thought for the morrow, for the time to come. Be not anxious for the future, how you shall live next year, or when you are old, or what you shall leave behind you. As we must not boast of tomorrow, so we must not care for to-morrow, or the events of it. God has given us life, and has given us the body. And what can he not do for us, who did that? If we take care about our souls and for eternity, which are more than the body and its life, we may leave it to God to provide for us food and raiment, which are less. Improve this as an encouragement to trust in God. We must reconcile ourselves to our worldly estate, as we do to our stature. We cannot alter the disposals of Providence, therefore we must submit and resign ourselves to them. Thoughtfulness for our souls is the best cure of thoughtfulness for the world. Seek first the kingdom of God, and make religion your business: say not that this is the way to starve; no, it is the way to be well provided for, even in this world. The conclusion of the whole matter is, that it is the will and command of the Lord Jesus, that by daily prayers we may get strength to bear us up under our daily troubles, and to arm us against the temptations that attend them, and then let none of these things move us. Happy are those who take the Lord for their God, and make full proof of it by trusting themselves wholly to his wise disposal. Let thy Spirit convince us of sin in the want of this disposition, and take away the worldliness of our hearts.

 


KIRK’S COMMENTARY

The past is gone, the future is an unfulfilled promise, today is a present. We are wise to make the most of today. There is no time like now. Time is like a stream of flowing water; a river connected the clouds and the oceans. We are in its midst. Carpe diem. If it’s to be, it’s up to me (and my team and most importantly my God). All I can do is all I can do but all I can do is enough, Lord willing.

This verse appears to be a prerequisite to the previous one due to its position and the ‘therefore’ as v34 begins. Here is v33: But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things will be added unto you.

James tells us not to boast what we care going to do tomorrow and in the future. This verse is like the antithesis. That we should not fret over it. We shouldn’t be over or under confident in ourselves but trust in our mighty God and do our best. He is more than sufficient.

God cares for everyone for He is love yet the principles of life are congruent and work for those who heed his ways and in particular seek to serve Him. Like any healthy relationship, it is reciprocal.



KIRK’S PRAYER

Good God, you know me better than I know myself. You know my needs. Help me to serve you first and watch you work it all out. Your Scriptures are robust in deeds. I trust in You first and foremost.

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