If you abide in Me… John 15:7-8

Yet God is a God of relationship. He is a God of communion, and He longs to be close to you. He appreciates the occasional biggies you do for Him, but much more, He desires your consistent obedience and ever-deepening relationship. He wants to know you truly love and value Him—not just for what He can do for you, but for who He is.

God longs for you to fully live out the plan and destiny He has created for you. But that can happen only in the context of a relationship with Him.

In Scripture, that’s called “abiding,” and it is one of the most strategic and satisfying things you could ever do.

Tony Evans, Called for a Purpose

Verse 7. – In this verse he returns once more on the principle of union with himself, and of what will come out of it. The disciples may be sorely distressed at this possible doom, for whatever may be the lot of those who do not obey the gospel and are ignorant of the Law of God, the curse here uttered fails heavily upon those who have been once enlightened, etc., and have apostatized (Hebrews 6:4-6). The anxiety of the apostles ]s grievous, and they desire deliverance from this doom. And our Lord next unfolds the principle of prayer which laid such hold on the mind of the Apostle John: If ye abide in me (and then, instead of adding, “And I abide in you,” he says); and my words abide in you; i.e. if my teaching so abide with you as to control your thoughts and ideas, remain in you as your guide and inspiration, then ask whatsoever ye will, and it shall be done to you. A timid interpretation of this promise limits the “whatsoever” to deeds of service in the kingdom of God, and fears, with Augustine, to trust the sanctified will of the believer. But in such harmony with Christ as these words supply, all the conditions of acceptable prayer are present.

The believer in Christ, full of his words, evermore consciously realizing union with Christ, charged with the thoughts, burning with the purposes, filled with words of Jesus, will have no will that is not in harmony with the Divine will. Then faith is possible in the fulfillment of his own desire, and prayer becomes a prophecy and pledge of the answer. The apostle, after many years of pondering and of putting these principles into practice, confirms the truth of them (1 John 5:14-16). This is the true philosophy of prayer. The psalmist had gone a long way in the same direction (Psalm 37:4, “Delight thyself in the Lord; and he shall give thee thy heart’s desire”).

Pulpit Commentary

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